According to the CDC, there are several critical risks after a hurricane. In fact, after Hurricane Matthew, many homes and lives were lost because of the extreme vulnerabilities each and every family and business faces. Often, desperation leads regular people to do things they would never consider doing such as looting, taking possession of another person’s home and possessions, begging, getting into fights and arguments, and generally being pessimistic and angry about the situation.

Stress from property damage, flooding, power outages, carbon monoxide poisoning, insect bites, inaccessible to basic services and being stranded without help is the normal after a hurricane.  Some of the frustrating results from a CDC study reveal that:

  • 44% of Americans do not own a first aid kit
  • 48% of American households do not have emergency supplies
  • 20% of Americans rely completely on the Internet for information but fail to keep a fully charged battery on standby
  • 52% of American adults do not have copies of their personal documents such as property titles, IDs, and insurance policies among others

What You Can Do Now Before the Hurricane Season Starts

While you cannot be expected to be 100% prepared for a major calamity like a hurricane, you can prevent unnecessary damage and personal trauma by taking these steps to ensure you and your family’s safety:

  1. Start From the Inside Out

One way to feel that you have done enough to protect your family is to be organized. Start first with personal safety. This means putting aside some funds for emergency situations, getting your emergency supplies, first aid kit, fully charged battery for mobile phones and other critical gadgets, basic daily needs like matches, water, rope, blanket, etc.

  1. Reinforce your Home and Property

Inspect your home and other properties or structures. Your vulnerable areas would be the windows and doors which means you should consider one time investment in hurricane windows and doors.

  1. Ensure a Safe and Relatively Stress-Free Immediately Life After a Hurricane

You can do this by meeting with all members of your household and agree on a plan of action. This should include a convergence spot in the house during a hurricane both inside the house and when family members are out. Each member should have emergency funds that they can easily access in case there are no ATM or bank services. Everyone should have IDs and copies of crucial documents. Personal items of extreme importance and sentimental value should be given a safe storage place and one person be given the responsibility of keeping them before the hurricane comes.

Finally, regular meetings should be held to remind and update everyone about ideas and steps taken to augment your safety protocol, especially if there are young children in the home.